Last edited by Gusar
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

5 edition of Germany and European Integration: The Common Agricultural Policy found in the catalog.

Germany and European Integration: The Common Agricultural Policy

An Area of Conflict

by Gisela Hendricks

  • 224 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Berg Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • EU & European institutions,
  • European Economic Community countries,
  • Agricultural Policy,
  • History,
  • Politics/International Relations,
  • History: World,
  • Germany,
  • Agriculture and state,
  • History / Europe / General,
  • Europe,
  • Europe - General,
  • European Economic Community,
  • European Economic Community co

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages256
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8300148M
    ISBN 100854966919
    ISBN 109780854966912

    a customs-free area surrounded by a common tariff within which manufactured goods can move freely and where there is a common agricultural policy. among its six founding members: Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany. European Parliament and opposition to the process of political European integration.   In absolute terms, France benefits the most from the Common Agricultural Policy, receiving about 17 percent of the policy's allocations, followed by Germany, Spain, Italy and the United Kingdom. However, because of the size of their economies, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom are net contributors to the Common Agricultural Policy .

    ost scholars of President Charles de Gaulle’s policy toward European integration now agree that it was motivated primarily by political- to demand the establishment of a Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), to press for the Fouchet Plan, to veto British membership in and , Charles de Gaulle and Europe. Gaulle. EEC. This hugely successful history of political and economic integration in Western Europe since the Second World War -- and especially, but by no means exclusively, the European Community itself -- was first published in , to general acclaim. Since then much turbulent water has flowed under the bridges of Maastricht and Strasbourg. Now, in this welcome Second Edition, .

    Abstract. The purpose of this chapter is to review the academic literature that has contributed to the debate about the European Union’s (EU’s) common agricultural policy (CAP), and the close links between the CAP and the process of economic by: 2. Whilst this granted the economic region of East Germany full membership in the European Single Market with its several regional and structural development funds as well as the Common Agricultural Policy, it also exposed all productive entities in the joining region to unprotected competition from West Germany and to some degree from the world Author: Johannes Stephan.


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Germany and European Integration: The Common Agricultural Policy by Gisela Hendricks Download PDF EPUB FB2

Germany and European Integration: The Common Agricultural Policy: An Area of Conflict by Gisela Hendricks (Author)Cited by: 2. Germany and European integration: the Germany and European Integration: The Common Agricultural Policy book agricultural policy: an area of conflict.

[Gisela Hendriks] -- An examination of West Germany's European policies with particular reference to the Common Agricultural policy (CAP). Book: Germany and European integration: the Common Agricultural Policy: an area of conflict. + pp. Abstract: The commitment of the new united Germany germany Subject Category: Geographic EntitiesCited by: marks the 50th anniversary of the common agricultural policy (CAP), a cornerstone of European integration that has provided European citizens with five decades of secure food supply and a living countryside.

The CAP was created so that people could enjoy good food at affordable prices and farmers earn a fair living. Fifty years on, these aims are still valid.

Down. Summary: The Common Agricultural Policy was the most important policy for the longest duration of the European Economic Community's existence. Apart from subsidizing and modernizing European agriculture and securing supplies for its consumers, this policy was meant to be the beacon of European integration.

Making agriculture sustainable is a global challenge. In the European Union (EU), the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is failing with respect to biodiversity, climate, soil, land degradation as well as socio‐economic challenges. The European Commission's proposal for a CAP post‐ provides a scope for enhanced : Guy Pe'er, Guy Pe'er, Aletta Bonn, Aletta Bonn, Helge Bruelheide, Petra Dieker, Nico Eisenhauer, Pet.

At the outset of European integration, farming featured high on the political agenda for good reason: the food security of postwar Europe was at stake. But by the s, subsidies to agriculture still accounted for two-thirds of the EU budget.

Today, the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) accounts for roughly 38 percent of spending, the. common policies: the common agricultural policy (Articles 38 to 43), transport policy (Articles 74 and 75) and a common commercial policy (Articles to ).

The common market is intended to guarantee the free movement of goods and the mobility of factors of production (the free movement of workers and enterprises, the.

Will the choices made regarding the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) for the period be part of the continued dismantling of this European policy or will they help provide it with meaning again?This is the question that has been raised once more since the draft CAP regulations were unveiled by the European Commission on 1st Junei.e.

barely. International trade - International trade - Development of a common agricultural policy: When the Treaty of Rome took effect at the beginning ofagriculture was subsidized in all six member countries.

The various price-support mechanisms differed substantially, as did foreign-trade policies and tariff levels. The cumulative impact of governmental intervention of various. The History of European Integration and the Common Agriculture Policy since PATEL, Kiran Klaus (editor/s) Baden-Baden, Nomos, Cited by: The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) has a multitude of facets and is in constant evolution.

Successive reforms have effected many changes to the incentives that the French and European Union (EU) rural sectors face and how the French, EU and global economies react to it. Since its inception, the CAP has evolved from aAuthor: Pierre H Boulanger, Patrick Jomini, Xiao-Guang Zhang, Catherine Costa, Michelle Osborne.

Despite substantial reforms, the European Union (EU)'s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is still criticised for its detrimental effects on developing countries. This paper provides updated evidence on the impact of the CAP on one developing country, Uganda. It goes beyond estimating macrolevel economic effects by analysing the impacts on by: 8.

This is one of the reasons why Rye has written the book Norge i Europa (Norway in Europe), which was recently published by Fagbokforlaget. It focuses on Norway’s relationship to European integration.

the development of a common agricultural policy. France was a major producer and exporter of agricultural commodities, and the United. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to navigation Jump to search. Kiran Klaus Patel (born 3 October ) is a German-British historian. He holds a Chair at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, and is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Book Description. The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is a unique agricultural policy worldwide. For many years, its status as the only common European Community (EC) policy governed by EC institutions put it at the heart of European integration.

The Treaty of Rome () established the European Economic Community (EEC), comprising Germany, France, Italy and the Benelux countries, all of which were bound to a Common Agricultural Policy (CAP).Cited by: Globalization and European Integration: The Changing Role of Farmers in the Common Agricultural Policy [Hennis, Marjoleine] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Globalization and European Integration: The Changing Role of Farmers in the Common Agricultural PolicyCited by:   The common agricultural policy, better known as the CAP, is a system of subsidies paid to EU farmers. Its main purposes are to guarantee minimum levels of production, so that Europeans have enough Author: Simon Jeffery.

The Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) is the agricultural policy of the European Union. It implements a system of agricultural subsidies and other programmes. It was introduced in and has undergone several changes since then to reduce the cost (from 73% of the EU budget in to 37% in [1]) and to also consider rural development in its aims.

Over two thousand books and articles in over forty-five languages have been devoted to the life of General Charles de Gaulle. 1 Thousands more treat his policies within the context of European integration, postwar Western defense, or French foreign policy.The tables below show basic statistical data in several areas relating to the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), namely: the agriculture and food industries in the Member States (Table II), the integration of environmental concerns into the CAP (Table III), the forestry sector (Table IV), CAP financing and expenditure (Tables I and V) and trade in agricultural and food.

It is not only the French concern about reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) that makes France reluctant to accept the future institutional system before making budgetary decisions.